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Foreign Policy and National Security

The United States can and should be a driving force around the world for freedom, human rights, and peace. This does not mean we should turn first to war and violence. Too many times, our first response to a foreign policy problem has been military action. Unilateral military interventions are counterproductive to our strategic goals and prolong violence and suffering. I support working together with the international community to find thoughtful diplomatic solutions for the complex issues facing our world.

I opposed the invasion of Iraq in 2003, and I continue to oppose the broad authorization of military force that has operated as a blank check for military use for 15 years. As a member of the House Armed Services Committee, I will push for diplomatic solutions, increased foreign assistance, and the need to conduct robust congressional oversight. I support innovative responses to 21st century national security threats.


Click here to learn more about the bills that I introduced and cosponsored.

Read my op-ed in The New York Times on U.S. involvement in the unconstitutional war in Yemen.

Read my op-ed in The Los Angeles Times on developing a 21st century foreign policy.

More on Foreign Policy and National Security

May 4, 2018 In The News

What countries in Eastern Europe might have once assumed were domestic debates over World War II history are spilling over into major international disputes and causing problems for their relations with the United States.

Last month, more than 50 members of Congress sent a letter to the State Department that expressed concerns about “state-sponsored Holocaust distortion and denial.” The lawmakers note that both Poland and Ukraine recently passed laws relating to World War II history and claim these are connected to rising incidents of anti-Semitism.

April 25, 2018 Press Release

Washington, DC – Congressman Ro Khanna (CA-17) and Congressman David N. Cicilline (RI-01) are leading more than 50 House Republicans and Democrats in pushing for the U.S. Department of State to exert diplomatic pressure on Ukraine and Poland for recent in incidents of state-sponsored Holocaust denial and anti-Semitism.

April 25, 2018 In The News

More than 50 U.S. Congress members condemned Ukrainian legislation that they said “glorifies Nazi collaborators” and therefore goes further than Poland’s laws on rhetoric about the Holocaust.

The condemnation came in an open bipartisan letter to Deputy Secretary of State John Sullivan that was initiated by Democratic Reps. Ro Khanna of California and David Cicilline of Rhode Island.

March 28, 2018 Press Release

Washington, DC – It is time for Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) President Joseph Kabila to respect his country’s constitution and accept the upcoming elections on December 23rd. Since his second and final term ended in 2016, he has held on to power and delayed elections.

March 19, 2018 Press Release

Washington, DC -- As the Senate is expected to debate S.J. Res. 54, a resolution to force the first-ever Senate debate and vote to remove U.S. Armed Forces from unauthorized hostilities, Rep. Khanna, member of the House Armed Services committee and sponsor of H.Con.Res. 81, a resolution closely resembling the Senate version, issued the following statement:

February 2, 2018 In The News

Silicon Valley Congressman Ro Khanna sat down with ABC7 News' Larry Beil to discuss his thoughts on the GOP memo that was released on Friday.

The contents of the controversial Republican memo alleging abuses of government surveillance powers at the FBI and Justice Department have been debated, and now the American public is now be able to read them in detail.

February 2, 2018 Press Release

Santa Clara, CA – In response to the release of the Nuclear Review Posture, Rep. Ro Khanna of the House Armed Service Committee issued the below statement:

January 23, 2018 In The News

As if more evidence were needed that there are distressingly few, if any, grown-ups presently

working within the confines of the West Wing, the final days of 2017 saw the emergence of several reports that the Trump administration is considering launching a preemptive attack on North Korea.

January 23, 2018 In The News

The U.S. Congress has proposed a bill to prohibit the government from conducting any preemptive strikes against North Korea.

A group of 65 lawmakers — led by U.S. Representative for California, Ro Khanna — submitted the bill named "No Unconstitutional Strike Against North Korea Act," last week, according to Congress.

The bill is under review from military committees of Congress.

January 19, 2018 In The News

Dozens of lawmakers sent a letter to President Donald Trump, urging him to reestablish military-to-military contact with North Korea in order to prevent any miscalculations that could evolve into "a great conflict, including nuclear war."

The letter, signed by 32 Democrats and one Republican, said: "We write to request the reestablishment of military-to-military communication between the United States and North Korea. The U.S. should do all in its power to avoid misunderstandings that could escalate to a great conflict, including nuclear war."