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Congressman Ro Khanna

Representing the 17th District of California

Foreign Policy and National Security

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The United States can and should be a driving force around the world for freedom, human rights, and peace. This does not mean we should turn first to war and violence. Too many times, our first response to a foreign policy problem has been military action. Unilateral military interventions are counterproductive to our strategic goals and prolong violence and suffering. I support working together with the international community to find thoughtful diplomatic solutions for the complex issues facing our world.

I opposed the invasion of Iraq in 2003, and I continue to oppose the broad authorization of military force that has operated as a blank check for military use for 15 years. As a member of the House Armed Services Committee, I will push for diplomatic solutions, increased foreign assistance, and the need to conduct robust congressional oversight. I support innovative responses to 21st century national security threats.


Click here to learn more about the bills that I introduced and cosponsored.

Read my op-ed in The New York Times on U.S. involvement in the unconstitutional war in Yemen.

Read my op-ed in The Los Angeles Times on developing a 21st century foreign policy.

More on Foreign Policy and National Security

November 16, 2017 In The News

The Pentagon more than doubled US refueling support for the Saudi-led mission in Yemen over the past year, a spokeswoman told Al-Monitor, despite mounting public and congressional concerns about the operation.

November 14, 2017 In The News

The U.S. House unanimously passed a non-binding resolution Monday asserting U.S. military assistance to Saudi-led coalition fighting Yemen’s Shiite rebels is not covered by previous war authorizations.

November 14, 2017 In The News

The House of Representatives on Monday voted 366-30 to declare what has long been known — that it has not authorized U.S. action in support for the Saudi-led war in Yemen, but other than urging the parties to come to a negotiated solution, the resolution did not actually do anything to end American participation in the conflict.

November 14, 2017 In The News

The U.S. Congress made a rare show on Monday night of exercising its oversight powers on matters of war and peace, with the House voting overwhelmingly on a resolution stating that U.S. participation in the Saudi-led bombing campaign in Yemen is not covered under existing authorizations for the use of military force, is counterproductive to the fight against al-Qaida, and is contributing to a dire humanitarian crisis in Yemen.*

November 14, 2017 In The News

The United States has spent years helping Saudi Arabia bombard Yemen, killing thousands of civilians along the way. Now members of Congress say America needs to stop supporting the bloodshed.

November 14, 2017 In The News

In a rare attempt to stand up to U.S. conflicts abroad, the House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed a resolution on Monday which states that U.S. military support for Saudi Arabia in its war against Yemen has not been authorized by Congress.

November 13, 2017 In The News

The U.S. House voted, 366-30, on Monday night to pass a resolution condemning civilian deaths, starvation and the spread of disease in Yemen, admitting that much of the responsibility for that humanitarian crisis rests with the U.S. because of its support for a Saudi-led military intervention and noting that the war has allowed al Qaeda, Islamic State and other groups to thrive.

November 13, 2017 In The News

In a rare exercise of its war-making role, the House of Representatives on Monday overwhelmingly passed a resolution explicitly stating that U.S. military assistance to Saudi Arabia in its war in Yemen is not authorized under legislation passed by Congress to fight terrorism or invade Iraq.

November 13, 2017 In The News

The House adopted a measure on Monday to call for a political solution to the conflict in Yemen as a compromise to a bipartisan group of lawmakers who had sought a vote on a measure to stop the U.S. military’s participation.

The resolution, which passed 366-30 with one lawmaker, Rep. Hank Johnson (D-Ga.), voting “present,” denounces the targeting of civilian populations in Yemen and calls on all parties involved to “increase efforts to adopt all necessary and appropriate measures to prevent civilian casualties and increase humanitarian access.”

November 13, 2017 In The News

US politicians are set to debate a resolution that would limit "unauthorised" American involvement in the Saudi-led war in Yemen, but the bill is unlikely to move past the House of Representatives, analysts say. 

H.CON.RES.81 is expected to be debated on the House floor on Monday. It calls for the invocation of the War Powers Act to end US participation in the war in Yemen. 

The act, introduced in 1973, requires Congressional approval for the country's involvement in any war.